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“Amazing conference organization
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Multinational Company
in the Balkan Countries

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excellent speakers.”

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RE company-Western Europe
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Perfect location to reach

The Venue

Venue

Must see in Madrid

Royal Palace
Royal Palace
Spain’s lavish Royal Palace (Palacio Real) is a jewel box of a palace, although it’s used only occasionally for royal ceremonies; the royal family moved to the modest Palacio de la Zarzuela years ago.
When the alcázar (Muslim fortress) burned down on Christmas Day 1734, Felipe V, the first of the Bourbon kings, decided to build a palace that would dwarf all its European counterparts. Felipe died before the palace was finished, which is perhaps why the Italianate baroque colossus has a mere 2800 rooms, just one-quarter of the original plan.
Gran Vía
Gran Vía
Gran Vía (literally “Great Way”) is a street located in central Madrid, Spain. It leads from Calle de Alcalá, close to Plaza de Cibeles, to Plaza de España.

The street, sometimes referred to as the “Spanish Broadway”, is one of the city’s most important shopping areas, with a large number of hotels and large movie theatres; however, in recent years, many of these theatres have been replaced by shopping centres.

The Gran Vía serves as showcase of early 20th-century revival architecture, with architectural styles ranging from Vienna Secession style, Plateresque, Neo-Mudéjar, Art Deco, and others

Atocha railway station
Atocha railway station
Madrid Atocha’s beautiful original train shed opened in 1892. A hundred years later, it had its tracks removed in 1992 and is now a lovely tropical garden complete with turtle pool. There are several bars & restaurants with outside tables, making this a great place to wait for your train. The left luggage lockers are in the far right corner in the photo below. There’s an exit to the ground level taxi rank on the left, roughly level with all that greenery.
Cybele Palace
Cybele Palace
The palace was built on one of the sides of the Plaza de Cibeles in the Los Jerónimos neighbourhood (district of Retiro) and occupies about 30,000 m2 of what were the old gardens of the Buen Retiro.[1] The choice of the site generated some controversy at the time for depriving Madrid of recreational space.[2] The first stone of the building was laid in 1907. The building was officially opened on 14 March 1919 and began operating as a modern distribution centre for post, telegraphs and telephones. Following some architectural changes to the building’s exterior, such as the expansion of two floors and the street and pathway of Montalbán, it began to house municipal offices of the City of Madrid in 2007, moving its departments from the Case de la Villa (House of the City) and the Casa de Cisneros, which were both located in the Plaza de la Villa. This renovation of the building from the early twenty-first century also included a cultural area called “CentroCentro”.

Museo Nacional del Prado
Museo Nacional del Prado
The Prado Museum (/ˈprɑːdoʊ/ PRAH-doh; Spanish: Museo del Prado [muˈseo ðel ˈpɾaðo]), officially known as Museo Nacional del Prado, is the main Spanish national art museum, located in central Madrid. It is widely considered to have one of the world’s finest collections of European art, dating from the 12th century to the early 20th century, based on the former Spanish Royal Collection, and the single best collection of Spanish art. Founded as a museum of paintings and sculpture in 1819, it also contains important collections of other types of works. The Prado Museum is one of the most visited sites in the world, and it is considered one of the greatest art museums in the world. The numerous works by Francisco Goya, the single most extensively represented artist, as well as by Hieronymus Bosch, El Greco, Peter Paul Rubens, Titian, and Diego Velázquez, are some of the highlights of the collection.
Mercado de San Miguel
Mercado de San Miguel
Madrid’s Mercado de San Miguel is well-known to city locals and is gathering the attention of international visitors. This small market is located near the Plaza Mayor and is filled with delightful foods to try. You can pick up some produce or pastries, traditional Spanish croquettes and other delicacies. As usual get there early to beat the crowds!
Crystal Palace
Crystal Palace
Located in the centre of the Buen Retiro Park in central Madrid is an imposing glass palace modelled on London’s Crystal Palace. It was built around 36 years after its London counterpart in 1887, and designed by the architect Ricardo Velázquez Bosco who was responsible for another building in the park, the Palacio de Velázquez. He had also worked on such prestigious restoration projects as the Mezquita in Córdoba and the Alhambra in Granada.
Temple of Debod
Temple of Debod
The structure is an authentic temple built in ancient Egypt to honor the god Amun and the goddess Isis. Its original location was about 9 miles south of the city of Aswan close to the Nile River.

Construction of the temple started in the second century B.C. under the orders of Meroë King Adijalamani and continued throughout the next few centuries. The full temple as we see it today wasn’t completed until Egypt’s Roman period. As a result, it packs the influence of multiple iconic civilizations into one structure.

The temple’s Madrid story doesn’t begin until the 1960s, when the construction of the Aswan High Dam posed a threat to this magnificent historical treasure. Rather than leave it in place and risk irreparable damage, the Egyptian government offered the temple as a gift to Spain as thanks for helping restore other ancient temples in the area. In 1968, the Temple of Debod was completely deconstructed, moved to Madrid, and rebuilt in Madrid’s Parque del Oeste.

Tips for attendees