vienna
Welcome to Vienna!

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Must see in Vienna

Schönbrunn Palace
Schönbrunn Palace
Visit Empress Sisi’s former summer residence.This baroque complex contains an enchanting park, the Palm House, the Gloriette and a zoo. Spend an entire day at Schönbrunn: visit the show rooms, admire the splendid Bergl Rooms, and stroll through the “Labyrinth.”
Schönbrunn Palace, the former summer residence of the imperial family, is one of Europe’s most impressive Baroque palace complexes. The land had been in the possession of the Habsburgs since 1569, when the wife of Emperor Ferdinand II. had a summer residence built there in 1642, which she called “Schönbrunn”. The palace and garden complex built here from 1696, after the Turkish occupation, was redesigned from the ground up by Maria Theresia after 1743. For most of the year, the Habsburgs resided in the countless chambers that a large imperial family needed in addition to the formal state rooms.
St. Stephen's Cathedral
St. Stephen's Cathedral
St. Stephen’s Cathedral is the symbol of Vienna. Construction commenced in the 12th century. Today, it is one of the most important Gothic structures in Austria.
St. Stephen’s Cathedral is 107.2 meters long and 34.2 meters wide. It has four towers. The tallest of these is the south tower at 136.44 meters. The tower room, from which there is a gigantic view across Vienna, is reached via 343 steps. A total of 13 bells hang here. However, the best-known bell of St. Stephen’s Cathedral, the Pummerin, is located in the 68.3 meter-tall north tower. It is the second-biggest free-swinging chimed church bell in Europe. On the roof of St. Stephen’s Cathedral, colorful roof tiles were laid to create the Royal and Imperial double-headed eagle and the coat of arms of the city of Vienna. The interior of St. Stephen’s Cathedral was changed again and again over the centuries, right through to the Baroque period.
 Belvedere
Belvedere
See Gustav Klimt’s legendary painting “The Kiss” as well as major works by Schiele and Kokoschka for yourself. You’ll be delighted by the magnificent ba-roque palace complex and its extensive gardens.
Prince Eugene of Savoy (1663-1736), successful general and art connoisseur, had Belve-dere garden palace built by Johann Lukas von Hildebrandt as his summer residence – at the time it was still outside the gates of the city.

Albertina
Albertina
The Albertina not only has the largest and most valuable graphical collections in the world, with works such as Dürer’s “Hare” and Klimt’s studies of women. Its latest exhibition collection presents masterpieces of the Modern, spanning Monet to Picasso and Baselitz. As the largest Hapsburg residential palace, the Albertina dominates the southern tip of the Imperial Palace on one of the last remaining fortress walls in Vienna.
hufburg imperial palace
hufburg imperial palace
ntil 1918, the Hofburg was the center of the gigantic Habsburg empire. Originally planned as a lavish “Imperial forum”, the grounds were built up majestically by the Habsburg emperors – from the 13th century “Alte Burg” to the most recent addition from around 1900. Today, the Hofburg in Vienna is the official seat of the Austrian President. No traveler to should pass up the opportunity to visit the Hofburg: Here you will find more than two dozens collections of international standing. You will also discover cafés, restaurants, squares and parks to while away the time. Welcome to an imperial march through history, art and luxury, welcome to the Hofburg.
St. Charles Church
St. Charles Church
A magnificent religious building with a large cupola: St. Charles’ Church, the last work of the eminent baroque architect Johann Bernhard Fischer von Erlach.
The church, finished in 1739 by his son Joseph Emanuel Fischer von Erlach, was built as the result of a vow taken by Emperor Charles VI during a plague epidemic. The church is consecrated to the patron saint of the Habsburg emperor, Saint Charles Borromeo: The exhibits in the small Museo Borromeo include the traveling clothes of the Bishop of Milan.
Vienna's Ringstrasse
Vienna's Ringstrasse
Vienna’s Ringstrasse is 5.3 kilometers long. Long enough to provide space for numerous monumental buildings, which were built during the period of Historicism in the 1860s to 1890s. Today, the buildings that stand there – from the Vienna State Opera to the Museum of Fine Arts – are among the most important sights in the city of Vienna.
“It is my will…” – with these words, Emperor Franz Joseph ordered the building of the Ringstrasse in 1857. Nobles and rich citizens hurried to build pompous palaces along this magnificent boulevard. Many of these former private homes can still be admired today (mostly, however, only from the outside). The style in which the buildings were built went down in history as the Ringstrasse style (a type of Historicism). It is marked by a pluralism of styles: numerous architectural forms of previous epochs were imitated.
Museum of Technology
Museum of Technology
The Vienna Museum of Technology offers extraordinary insights into the world of technology in a space of 22,000 square meters.

The unique exhibits, from the past to the future, make the museum a showplace for exciting technological developments. Multimedia presentations illuminate the influence of technological achievements on our society, economy and culture. Visitors experience the extraordinary world of technology.

Tips for attendees